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WFU/London: Worrell House
London, England
Program Terms: Fall: WFU House,
Spring: WFU House
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Spring: WFU House 2016 03/15/2015 03/15/2015 TBA TBA
Fact Sheet:
 GPA Requirement:
2.50
 Class Status:
2 semesters completed
 Language of Instruction:
English
 Prior Language Study Required:
None
 Housing:
WFU House
 Open to non-WFU Students:
No
 Academic Areas Offered:
Art, Business (ACC, BEM & FIN), English, Entrepreneurship, History, Math Business, Math Economics, Politics and International Affairs, Theater
Program Description:

Discover London at the Worrell House

Each fall and spring semester, a group of Wake Forest students and a Resident Professor live and study together at Worrell House. Students marvel at the extension of the classroom into the city of London. Courses integrate visits to art galleries, theater performances, historical sites, and musical productions. All students take five courses that are taught at Worrell House. Three courses are taught by British professors and usually include Art History, History, and Theater. In addition, the Wake Forest Resident Professor teaches two courses from his/her discipline. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, leaving a three-day weekend for exploring the city or travel to other destinations.
Worrell House London
Overview Each fall and spring semester, a group of Wake Forest students and a Resident Professor live and study together at Worrell House. Students marvel at the extension of the classroom into the city of London. Courses integrate visits to art galleries, theater performances, historical sites, and musical productions. All students take five courses that are taught at Worrell House. Three courses are taught by British professors and usually include Art History, History, and Theater. In addition, the Wake Forest Resident Professor teaches two courses from his/her discipline. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, leaving a three-day weekend for exploring the city or travel to other destinations.
Location London is one of Europe's largest and most cosmopolitan cities. Its famous sites include Buckingham Palace, the Tower of London, Trafalgar Square, Picadilly Circus, and Westminster Abbey. With a multitude of art galleries, museums, and pubs, London is endlessly interesting. The underground rail "tube" system provides easy access to all parts of the city. Students may conveniently visit Canterbury, Oxford, Bath, Dover, and other destinations (Scotland and Wales) via the excellent British railway system.

In 1977, Wake Forest purchased a large brick house in Hampstead for its London program. The house, a gift from Eugene and Ann Worrell, was named in their honor. Formerly known as Morven House, the building served as the home and studio of landscape painter Charles Edward Johnson.

Worrell House has four stories and is situated on Steele's Road (named for essayist Sir Richard Steele) in a sector of suburban London known as Hampstead. Hampstead is primarily a residential neighborhood and home to Hampstead Heath, Regent's Park, Primrose Hill, and the Keats Cottage. Two underground tube stops are within a 5-10 minute walk.
Program Each fall and spring semester, a group of Wake Forest students and a Resident Professor live and study together at Worrell House. Students marvel at the extension of the classroom into the city of London. Courses integrate visits to art galleries, theater performances, historical sites, and musical productions. All students take five courses that are taught at Worrell House. Three courses are taught by British professors and usually include Art History, History, and Theater. In addition, the Wake Forest Resident Professor teaches two courses from his/her discipline. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, leaving a three-day weekend for exploring the city or travel to other destinations. 

Standard Courses

ART 235 Art in London (D)
Survey of English painting, sculpture, and architecture in the Georgian, Victorian, and modern periods. Includes weekly prepaid gallery tours guided by a professor.

HST 226 History of London (3)
Topographical, social, economic, and political history of London from the earliest times. Lectures, student papers and reports, museum visits and lectures. Includes guided city walks, enabling students to gain a greater understanding of the content of the course.

THE 266 Modern English and Continental Drama and the London Stage (3h) (D)
Studies the works of major playwrights of England and Europe from 1875 to the present. Includes prepaid tickets to at least twelve productions of classic plays currently being presented in London theaters. May also include an excursion to Stratford-upon-Avon to view a classical Shakespearian performance. This course is cross listed as ENG 347 which can count as English major/minor credit or English divisional credit

POL 234 United Kingdom Politics in a Global Age (3h) (CD) This course is not typically taught at the Worrell House
Introduces the nature and content of contemporary United Kingdom politics by placing those politics in a wider analysis of United Kingdom history, society, and international positions.

Fall 2014 with Dr. Robert Browne, Biology

BIO 330 Land and Natural Resource Policy (3h)

BIO 350 Conservation Biology (3h)
Lectures, readings, and discussions examining biological resources, their limitations and methods or sustainability.  Genetic, aquatic, terrestrial, and ecosystem resources are examined.

Spring 2015 with Dr. Tom Brister, Political Science and International Affairs

POL 114 Comparative Government and Politics (3h) (CD, D)
Analysis of political institutions, processes, and policy issues in selected countries.  Case studies are drawn from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America.

POL 252 Topics in International Politics: Globalization (3h)

Fall 2015 with Dr. Page West, School of Business

BEM 271 (1.5h) / BEM 371 (1.5h) Business Strategy: From Mercantilism to Global Capitalism
This course will explore the relationship between global markets and business organizations that operate within them.  The context for this exploration will be the development of commerce from the time mercantilism originated in the 16th century in England and how it took shape through the ideas of Adam Smith and others.  We will draw on our location in England in part through visits to historically-important sites in the industrial revolution – such as guild halls and the docklands in east London, and to Manchester's factory sites. But central to the course narrative will be the ways in which the uniquely-British origins were subsequently transformed into contemporary ideas about markets and global trade in the modern era, and how business strategy has addressed this evolution. This agenda will bring us to the 21st century context, as England and much of Europe face their own fiscal challenges.

This course satisfies 3 hours of requirements for School of Business students majoring in BEM, FIN, and ACC.

BEM 318 Shakespeare on Leadership (3h)
William Shakespeare's history plays, his tragedies, and several of his comedies address a central preoccupation of the Elizabethans: the characteristics and qualities of leadership. Shakespeare raises almost every issue encountered by a modern leader. He holds up a mirror to the brilliant coups, the clever and the misguided strategies, the mistakes, and the struggles that make up the careers of most leaders of contemporary organizations. A key focus of this course is building an understanding of the dimensions of leadership. In London we will get involved with the Globe Theatre, attend plays, and experience what it is like to actually act like a leader. This course will offer a form of career guidance – a way for you to think about the choices you make, the associates with whom you work, and the impact of the organizational and social environments you are in, and those you will someday, yourselves, create.

This course satisfies 3 hours of requirements for School of Business students majoring  in BEM.

Spring 2016 with Prof. Mary Wayne-Thomas, Theatre and Entrepreneurship

THE 255 History of Costume (3h) (D)
Surveys the development of clothing and fashion with emphasis on historical and cultural influences and their application to costuming in art.

ESE 100 Creativity and Innovation (3h)
Interactive seminar introduces students to readings and processe from various disciplines that elucidate the interdisciplinary nature of creativity and enable students to create conditions that stimulate it.  Projects and assingments are designed to encourage a "critical creativity" that challenges participants through inquiry, multi-faceted exploration and strategic development.  Topics examined through writing and design assignments, group projects, and discussions include conciousness, receptivity, risk, ehtics, self-agency, and social engagement with the express objective of fostering creative potential and its application in all areas of experience.
This course is required for the Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise minor
Faculty Resident Professor
Fall 2014: Robert Browne, Biology
Spring 2015: Tom Brister, Political Science
Fall 2015: Page West, School of Business
Spring 2016: Mary Wayne-Thomas, Theatre
Accommodations Worrell House accommodates fourteen students. There are five student bedrooms, four bathrooms, a large kitchen, a student lounge, a living room, two libraries, and a seminar room. Modern kitchen facilities are available, and students often prefer to cook their meals together in the house. The house is wired for Internet access and students should bring their laptop computers. The living room, called the Churchill Room, was named in honor of the former prime minister and statesman. His daughter, Sarah Churchill, unveiled a bust of Churchill at the 1977 dedication of the house. A beautiful English garden is located behind the house. There is a ground floor apartment (flat) for the Resident Professor consisting of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a kitchen.
Excursions  
Selection The Resident Professor is responsible for selecting each group based on the following criteria:
  • Academic suitability
  • Social and emotional maturity
  • Classification (seniors given some priority)
  • Seriousness of the student in pursuing the academic and cultural aims of the program
  • Applicability of the program to the student's interests and studies
  • Majors in all disciplines are eligible.
Costs Students pay current Wake Forest tuition and housing fees. Students are responsible for all meals, round-trip airfare, additional travel, books, and other personal expenses.
Scholarships Special scholarships for study at Worrell House are available through the David Hadley/Worrell House Scholarship Fund, the Ivy Hixson Fund, and the Hubert Humphrey Studies Abroad Scholarship. Students may apply for additional scholarships through the Center for Global Programs and Studies.
Contact Dr. Kathy Smith
Program Director of the Worrell House and Professor of Political Science
Phone: (336) 758 5456
Email: smithkb@wfu.edu

Jessica Francis
Assistant Director for Study Abroad
Phone: (336) 758 3890
E-mail: francija@wfu.edu

House Address:
Worrell House
36 Steele's Road
Hampstead
London NW3 4RG
England
Phone: 011-44-207-722-3808
Fax: 011-44-207-722-2496
Testimonials  


 
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